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Boosting Your Career And Work Life With The Fallen Angels

Everyone wants that one job that allows them to evolve to the next level without actually spending too much time and effort to find it.

It may be simple on paper, but finding your career and ensuring that thing stays strong and solid for years to come is no easy feat.

That is why we need to get some spirit help to guide us and bring us to that higher level – where we are satisfied and certain that our employment is the next level for us, and one fallen angel can help us here …

Chahuiah – Developing your vision for what you want out of your career so that you can find your ideal job or career; allows you to find and secure the perfect position for long term employment that you can grow and rely on long term.

Having a job that is actually a career is no small thing – you have to position everything correctly from the start, and nothing can be too out of place.

With a career you have something you can build on and rely on for years to come. But with a job you typically have to work extra hard to get noticed and there might not be that much room for growth later when you are looking for something more.

It can not be that everything shifts for the better, but your money life and career stay idle.

Then there is the mistake of thinking you have a career but accidently settling for a dead end job – which is not too uncommon, but needs to stop, because you are driving for something much greater, and it just can not be like that.

In some situations having a job is perfectly fine, but if you need something reliable that has better pay – you will honestly need to look for something far more stable and beneficial for you long term, and that's where a career comes in handy.

Using the fallen angels in this way is the only right action, because you have to ask for guidance on something as big as this – and it does you no good to push for something that you have no idea how to find or attract.

These spirits can give you the edge that you are looking for, and without the hassle of dealing with all the heartache and work involved with accidently settling for jobs that only looked like careers from first glance.



Source by Donald B. Johnson

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Using Employment Sites in Your Job Search

Employment Site Job Search Resources

Employment web sites have been the greatest advance in the field of recruiting
since the creation of the resume. Since their first appearance on the World Wide
Web, job boards and career portals have connected more organizations to more
talent more efficiently than any other single medium in existence. Both employers
and recruiters now consider these sites a critical component of their sourcing and
recruiting strategy. Today, job boards and career portals serve virtually every
profession, craft and trade, in every industry, in every country of the world.

Employment Site Services & Features

Access to employment opportunities and job postings in your hometown and around
the world.

Private, automated notification by e-mail or RSS / XML of job openings that match
your employment objective.

Information about effective job search techniques.

Resources for a successful job search, such as resume writing assistance,
interviewing advice, salary and compensation information.

Links to additional job search and career management resources at other
sites.

Skills for effective career self-management.

Resume databases to announce your availability to potential employers and
recruiters

Selecting Employment Sites

With so many skilled related sites to choose from you really must find a way to
narrow your focus. Most people check out the big Employment Super Sites, like
Monster, Hot Jobs and CareerBuilder. But, they are not the only, or even always
the best, place to look. Smaller, more focused sites can often be much more useful
to you.

Specialized Industry or Occupation Employment Sites

These specialized sites focus on a specific niche, usually an industry,
profession, or a combination of both. These sites are highly targeted towards
the professionals of the specific industry it serves. The specialization means
the site is smaller, fewer jobs and fewer resumes and less competition for
the posted jobs.
Some employers will only use these sites because they are usually less
expensive than the Super Sites and their job postings do not get lost in the
postings from other companies.

Regional and Local Employment Sites

There are also local and regional job sites that can be effective in finding a
job in a specific location. Again, many of these sites include listings from
local employers who may not be included to post on the major jobs sites.

These sites focus on a specific geographic area, usually a city or state.
The upside on these is that the jobs should be located where you
want to work. The downside is that there may not be thousands of jobs listed.
Local and regional employers do not always post on the major jobs sites
like Monster or Hot Jobs. Instead, they will advertise on their local employment
site to avoid being overwhelmed with applicants and, often, because they
are not interested in paying relocation costs.

Visiting a Super Site such as Monster and using the location filter, for example,
Dallas, Texas will not result in the same results you get from using TexasJobs
and using Dallas as your search criteria. Even if you are conducting a national
job search it is worth visiting the regional and local sites.

Tips for Your Job Search

Most online job seekers concentrate all their efforts on the large,
well known commercial job search sites. The smaller specialized or regional
sites are often underutilized because they are difficult to find using traditional
search engines and they do not spend millions on advertising. Since these smaller
sites are underutilized, the sophisticated manager, professional or executive job
seeker will take full advantage of these specialized resources.

Use the Job Search Site Directory (s) to locate all of the sites that could be
useful in your job search. Concentrate your efforts on locating the sites
specific to your industry, occupation and target location. Do not focus on
the large job sites. Investigate the jobs and resources available on the specialized sites for
immediate use or for future reference.



Source by George H Smith

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11 Tips to an Organized Job Search

So, are you searching for a new job? Perhaps you are making a voluntary career transition. Maybe you have been laid off, or worse, fired. Regardless of the reason for your career move, one fact remains true: if you are conducting a job search, it is vital that you take an organized approach. Managing this search is just like managing any other major project. You must create an infrastructure that allows you to operate in an efficient and productive manner. A successful job search requires forethought and action. Here are some tips for conducting an organized job search.

    1. Declutter and Pre-Purge – If you are looking for a new job, it will be difficult to do so if your physical space is covered in clutter with piles of papers everywhere. Take some time to declutter. Purge any unnecessary items, file papers that you need to keep, recycle junk mail, and get some order back into that space! It will be easier for you to concentrate on your job search without all of that chaos and clutter around you. Just be careful that you do not spend too much time decluttering that you start using it as an excuse to procrastinate with regards to your job exploration. A few days should suffice.
    2. Create a Job Search Schedule – Let’s face it – searching for a job is hard work! If you are still employed while you are looking for a new position, be prepared to have an extremely busy schedule. If you are currently unemployed, realize that you do, indeed, have a job – conducting a job search! Create a schedule that gives you ample time for all of the activities you need to focus on in order to succeed: resume and cover letter preparation, surfing the web for jobs, networking, interviewing, follow-up, etc. Block out time in your calendar for job search activities and treat that time as you would any traditional work commitment. Be consistent in the amount of time you spend each day and week on new job activities so that you keep your momentum going, and do not lose focus and miss valuable opportunities.
    3. Get Your Gear in Order – Update your resume, cover letter, references, and writing sample (if applicable). Ask for letters of recommendation and testimonials from previous or current supervisors, co-workers, and professional collections. Get some nice new stationery, and stock up on print cartridges for your printer. If you want to use an outside source for printing, some local printing shops will copy resumes for free during an economic downturn, so ask around! Be sure to have a computer with high-speed Internet access. An all-in-one machine for printing, copying, faxing and scanning will also come in handy during a career move.
    4. Create Job Search Central – Set away space at home (or wherever you will be conducting your search activities) and make it job search central. Keep all of your job-search related supplies in that location, which will make it easy for you to find them when you need them. This will also help you to get into search mode when you are in that space.
    5. Create a Career Move Paper Management System – You may be acquiring a lot of paper in your search: resources, articles, sample resumes and cover letters, business cards of networking contacts, contact-us-later or rejection letters, etc. To the extent that you can maintain these items in a paperless fashion, go for it. But if you have to maintain hard copy paper, be sure to create a job search paper management or filing system, to be stored in your job search center. Keep it simple and use whatever system makes the most sense to you for ease of use (binder, portable filing bin, traditional filing cabinet, etc).
    6. Plan Job Search Activities – Plan out job search activities on a daily basis, such as phone calls to make, resumes to send, online applications to fill out, informational interviews to conduct, etc. Write down your search activities as calendar items, to-do’s, or tasks so that you take them seriously and treat them as measurable goals. Be realistic with regard to what you can reasonably accomplish in one day, but also challenge yourself!
    7. Track Activities – Organizing your job search involves keeping track of all information and communications. Keep a record of where you sent your resume and when, which you have spoken to, when interviews took place, etc. This information will prove vital when deciding when to follow-up with leads. You can track all of this information using a calendar such as Outlook or Google, or an online tool such as JobFiler.com. Whatever tools you use, it is important that you be able to track the status of your job search.
    8. Manage Job Search Email – In today’s world, much of your job search will likely be contacted by email. Therefore, before you even start your search, whittle down the amount of email in your inbox so that you can hyper-focus on your job search emails, which will add up quickly. Create folders within your email system using categories that make sense to you, such as Companies Applied To, Contacts Submitted Resumes To, etc.
    9. Polish Your Online Profiles – If you are searching for a new job in today’s market, you would be remiss not to develop an online presence on social media sites, especially LinkedIn, which is the most “professional” of the social media sites and can essentially serve as your online resume. But also consider other social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter. The opportunities are endless for employers and contacts to find you online. You may even have your own website, e-zine, or blog. Maybe you post articles on various article-marketing sites, or serve as a guest blogger on other blogs. If you maintain profiles on any social media sites, or have any type of online presence, be sure to polish your profiles so that they promote the image you want potential employers and contacts to see.
    10. Change Your Greetings – Change the message that greets callers for any phone number that you plan to use for your job search so that it sounds professional, and conveys the information you want callers to hear. Be prepared, not embarrassed!
    11. Stay Positive – The longer a job search takes, the more chance you have of becoming negative about it. Try to maintain a positive attitude to the estimated you can by monitoring your progress and staying active in your search. When the going gets rough during a job search, many people take a back seat and give up, which is counter-productive. Try to stay focused and make valuable contacts that are likely to lead to a job. However, do not be all consumed by your search for a job! Maintaining some balance in your life at this time will serve you well. Get adequate sleep, eat well, see family and friends for pleasure, and make time for exercise.

Organization is one of the single most important things you can do to keep your job search manageable. Just like being organized helps you improve any other area of ​​your life, home, or work, it will also help move along your job search in quick and efficient fashion and with less stress. It may even wind up being the key to finding that dream job you always wanted.

Good luck!

Source by Lisa Montanaro

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Who Cares About Work-Life Balance?

While preparing for a speaking engagement for a group of senior executives, I was briefly distracted by a thinking thought: what if this audience of high-achieving, hard-working, successful leaders does not care about work-life balance? What if they think the topic is irrelevant, unimportant and even counter-productive to what they believe has made them successful? What if, after my first introductory words and PowerPoint slide, they scoff at the concept of work-life balance and its importance to all workers? **

Fortunately, I paused and reflected on many of my clients’ work-life balance challenges and successes. Then my worried thought changed to a bit of a roar: Bring the Naysayers On!

More Naysayers

Why else say some work-life balance is irrelevant? Here are just a few possible quips:

  • “With the economy in its less-than-ideal state and many people concerned about job security, I should be happy to have a job and work as long and as hard as needed. lucky enough to have work to do. “
  • “As an entrepreneur, I need to work all of the time in order to keep my business going. My business success is completely dependent on how long and hard I work. “
  • “I’m looking for a job so I do not have any ‘work’ in my work-life balance.
  • “Work-life balance is not relevant to me as I’m a stay-at-home parent.

For each of the above statements, and just about any excuse that can be made against creating a better work-life balance, I argue that it matters to everyone.

Leaders

Whether you manage one person, or lead an organization with thousands of employees, supporting your staff to create a better work-life balance makes sense and cents. When people you work with feel you respect their work-life balance and allow them some autonomy in their choices, they will feel more valued, more engaged, and more committed to the organization. This does not mean just organization-wide policies. You can make a difference in your employees work-life balance by giving them support and tools to make choices that fit with each person’s individual work-life preferences. Keeping your staff satisfied keeps them working well and working for you.

I would also encourage you, as leaders and managers, to examine whether your actions are supportive or in opposition to your work-life balance philosophy shown at work. If you encourage your team to set boundaries between work time and downtime and then send emails at 2am, what message are you really sending?

Entrepreneurs

As an entrepreneur you may really need to ‘do it all.’ The question is can and must you ‘do it all’ now? There will always more to do – more clients to connect with, more services to provide, more products to develop, more marketing, more, more, more. For most people, the feeling of being on a treadmill 24/7 does not enable you to be at your most creative, creative or productive. Downtime away from your business, even for short time spans, will allow you to rejuvenate, rest, and relax in order for you to be at your best. Pay attention to times of the day when you work best, and use that time and your heightened energy and effectiveness to its fullest. Carve out chunks of time away from the business to explore, expand and escape.

Job Seekers

During the job search, you are the product that you are selling to a potential employer. The job interview is the sales call where you need to put the best version of your product in front of the customer. If that product is exhausted, scattered, overwhelmed or disheartened, you are illegally to ‘close the deal’ and receive a job offer. For most, a job search, especially when it is over an extended period of time, can be emotionally and physically draining. For job seekers, the challenges include: constant assessment against others, receiving negative responses from potential employers (or none at all), needing to be ‘on’ and high energy when networking, and questioning your competency and employability.

Work-life balance comes into play as you decide how much energy and focus to place on your job search activities. I advise clients that an effective job search is a full-time job. And, with full-time jobs, you need non-work time, too. Make sure you are taking time out of the job search to continue to develop yourself in your profession, engage in enjoyable and / or meaningful non-work activities and surround yourself with supportive friends, family and collections. A balanced job candidate makes a more effective and attractive job candidate.

Stay-at-Home Parents

Work-life balance is not just for those who have jobs that pay. Stay-at-home parents have full-time jobs that can take up all of their waking (and at times, sleeping) hours. And, like entrepreneurs, there is always more to do. What often gets lost in the overwhelm of parenting, housekeeping, cooking, volunteering, and all of the other day-to-day tasks are self-care, adult friendships, non-family hobbies, and staying in touch with past professional interests. For the stay-at-home parent, it is often assumed by others that there is an ability to always take on another errand, project or to-do item. Add sleep deprivation to the mix and it can be challenging to keep up with all there is to do and to be the type of parent, partner and community member you wish to be.

Work-life balance issues for stay-at-home parents include: the need to create boundaries to say ‘no’ to less important requests so you can say ‘yes’ to your priorities, awareness of what is important outside of your traditional parenting / home responsibilities, time for self-care; and space to evaluate and plan for if / when you decide to return to more traditional employment.

Everyone

Regardless of your professional situation, work-life balance matters – if we want to create highly functional work teams, successful companies with talented employees, viable and lucrative entrepreneurial ventures, effective job searches with high-caliber candidates, and nurturing families. Work-life balance is not just about how much time is spent on work activities and non-work activities- it’s about creating a work-life and a non-work life that works together based on the your own preferences, goals, values ​​and vision for your whole life. Who does not need that ?!

I would love to hear your thoughts to why work-life balance does matter to you!

** Fortunately, my concerns were not realized. The group was very engaged in the topic of work-life balance, examining their priorities and looking for opportunities to create boundaries to protect those priorities.

Source by Julie Cohen

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Energize a Stagnant Job Search – 7 Career Tips for Job Hunting

For those job seeking professionals that have been searching for a job for months or more, the whole job search process may seem a bit stale. Countless hours are often spent on job search websites and job search engines such as CareerBuilder.com, Dice.com, and Monster.com often resulting in minimal feedback. It is frustrating to go months without finding a job. Inevitability you begin to question career choices, your professional skills, experience, qualifications, or even your education. But you’re not alone. In times of high unemployment, a slow moving job market can create the appearance of a job search that becomes stagnated.

In this seven part series we will provide job search strategies and tips to revive your job hunt and reenergize your career confidence.

1) Part Time Job, a Temporary Job, or Volunteering

Seek out short term, part-time, or temporary work in your career field is a good way to get your foot in the door. Even if there does not seem to be any full time jobs opening any time soon, part time work and temp work is a way your employer can get to know you and your work ethic. If a job happens to open up or a new position is created, then you are at a higher advantage then others applicants who may be applying for that same job. You’ll have much more than a resume to show the company.

2) Work on your Personal Brand

If someone were to search for your name online, what, if anything would they see? In all likelihood, hiring you is a big investment to any company or organization. ESPecially in challenging economic times and an employee driven job market, companies are being more selective about their job applicants.

Take a few minuets and search for yourself online to determine what your digital footprint is. Do you share a name with someone that could create a career opportunity or a problem with your online image?

Use your personal brand to let the employee know your strengths, why they should hire you, and that you are a worthy candidate to investment in. If you remember, the personal brand is your life and professional skills as they appear online. You want your personal brand to be accurate and truthful, but you also want to it to make you look great to an employer. Your brand should reflect your overall qualifications, education, and indicate your career goals.

See what shows up in a Google search and a Yahoo search. Having a LinkedIn profile and profiles on other professional social networking sites can help to create a positive digital footprint. Your profile should be professional and consistent. Keep your information consistent with similar career goals and career objectives in each profile. Avoid blending social media and your online professional image. It is important to keep your private life PRIVATE. That is a mistake many people make with personal branding which may cost them being selected for that next job or opportunity.

3) Changing Careers or Branching Out to New Industries

Diversify you job search and branch out into new job markets you may not have considered in your previous job hunting strategies. Pick a career field, any career field and determine if your skills and qualifications would translate into new job opportunities.

That is not to say that you should just apply for the first job opening that presents itself. As a matter of fact, the opposite is true. Choose a career field that may benefit from your professional knowledge. Your best option is to look at a small geographic area and determine what employers are within this region. Examine what the area employer’s job positions and the job descriptions that they seeking and compare the qualifications to your resume. A midlife career change into a new industry can appear challenging but rewriting a career change resume and cover letter can quickly expand your employment options.

Examine your strengths. If you are not good with people, do not apply to personnel jobs. If you do not have an aptitude for math, do not apply for engineering or accounting jobs. Choose an industry or career field you know you can succeed in and focus your job search in that field. Perhaps you have not found a job yet because you are stretched across too many possible career paths. You may have missed an opportunity while you were wasting your time and applying to jobs that do not suit you. As a job search looks to drag on, it may seem tempting to try to apply for everything, but stay focused on your qualifications and job skills.

Be realistic about the types of jobs you are applying for. Most often when make a career transition into a new job market you will find yourself competitive for more junior level positions then you would within your current career field. Changing careers may seem like a step backwards; yet showing potential future employees you are capable of taking on new challenges, have the foresight, and flexibility to expand your skill set across industries can become a strong asset.

4) Use Career Counseling and Career Advice Services

Get some help. If month after month has passed with no job offers or employment prospect you may need some help with your job hunt. You do not want to be put in a position where your financial obligations overtake you focusing on your job search.

Recent college graduates and college alumni can use their college’s career services department. Beyond employment lists and postings, many college career service departments offer interview preparation assistance, resume writing and career advice, and can assist you in choosing a career path. These services are often helpful when you are considering changing careers or at a career transition. Also, many companies seek out students from specific universities, colleges, and specific degree program or departments. A career advisor in the schools career services can connect you with these companies.

Beyond the college or university career services centers, look into what career placement services your local city or county provides. Contact your local chamber of commerce to begin your search for these types of local services. Many of these services are either free of charge or at a minimum fee to local residents.

Depending on your specific situation, consider hiring a professional care advisor or career counselor. A professional career counselor’s job is to help you figure out exactly what you want to do and advise you on how to maximize your resources and qualifications.

Before electing to get a career counselor, do some research on what services the career counseling service provides and what their recent candidate placement success rates are. This way, you will know what to expect as an end result. Will they help you find a career path, provide resume writing advice and interview preparation, placement services, and help you along the way? Do not be afraid to ask for help when the job search looks to be dragging on. Having a career advisor or an independent career service can help you revitalize your job hunt.

5) Is Your Resume Writing Reflective of your Career Objective

Refresh your resume and your professional image. If your job search appears stalled, take this time to review your resume and your overall professional image. This includes your cover letter, professional social media sites such as Linked-In, and your professional references.

If employers have already seen your resume and you have not received any responses back, then this might be your cue to give your resume a second look. Check your resume for spelling mistakes, typos, and poor grammar. Those are a definite turn-off to any potential employer.

Do you think your online resume would pass the 20 second test? Remember that 20 seconds is generally the amount of time an employer will spend looking over your resume. In that time frame, an employer will decide whether or not he or she will call you in for a job interview. If it has been a while since you have been called for any interviews, then this may indicate that your resume does not pass the 20 second test. Some resume writing changes may be necessary. Also, be sure that your resume is aesthetically pleasing and your resume qualifications, education, and experience properly flows together.

6) Using only Top Job Search Engines can Limit Your Career Options

Not all job search websites are created equal. Searching that next job opportunity using online job search engines can distribute your resume to many companies and employment centers. Although, not all job search websites are weighted the same for your professional career field or industry.

Major job websites like Moster.com and CareerBuilder.com are great choices to broadcast your resume skills and qualifications. However, your chances in getting noticed on these online job search sites are low. Thousand of career professionals and job seekers are posting and updating their daily daily meetings, and in a highly competitive job market, being too general with your career objectives may not result in you owning that job.

Take some time to research what are the best job search sites, specific to your industry or career objectives. If your skilled field is within the medical industry, look for those web sites that focus specifically on medical jobs or nursing jobs. Expand your career and look for part time job search opportunities to get into a company or organization.

Be focused and specific in your job search and make sure you are looking everywhere. Limiting yourself to just a few major job sites can be disastrous. Many of the jobs you are seeking may not be listed on the common and the most popular job search engines. So, try looking at lesser known job sites, and on industry specific ones. Check your local newspaper daily, especially on Sunday editions. Sometimes a job listing may be printed on only one day in the newspaper.

Keep checking your professional social networking sites and keep your eyes open for indication of possible job openings. You may be missing out on great opportunities by limiting your search to one place. If you are unemployed, be sure to tell everyone that you are looking. People talk and word will get around. Your friend’s cousin’s girlfriend may be in the Human Resources department in a company where they are hiring. You could have surprised where you find your next job. Whatever you do, do not stop looking until you find what you are looking for.

7) Revisit your Long Term Career Choices

What long term career planning steps have you considered through your professional career. Often times we can become comfortable and somewhat complacent within our chosen occupation after we have met certain education and experience requirements. However, over time we can loose our job security if our skills are not continuously up to date or with economic shifts, technology innovations, or company restructuring.

If you find yourself in a position where there does not appear to be any jobs in your career field, they may consider changing industries. Change can be good, but when you mention changing careers, often people confuse this with more schooling or education, significant changes in their schedule, or starting back at the beginning. While any change may require some retraining or new on the job knowledge, changing careers maybe easier then one would think.

Examine what parallel industries or other careers use your same talents. Seek out career counseling and take several career tests to help you determine what industries you may unaware of that use your qualifications. A career counselor can help you with this decision and provide you some inside knowledge on specific career fields. If you do not have a career counselor, then you may want to think about who in your local area hire professionals with your skills and list all the things you loved about your old job. Then look for jobs that have those same qualities. You can also look at things you disliked about your old job, and look for jobs that do not have those qualities. Take a reputable personally or career test and consider jobs that work for your personality type.

The worst thing you can do is nothing, especially if you see major changes coming in your career field where your future employment could be effected. A proactive approach can open new doors and provide you with new career opportunities.

Source by Seneea C.

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What Is the Difference Between a Job, an Occupation and a Career?

Often the terms “job”, “occupation”, and “career” are used interchangeably. However, in actual fact, these terms have quite different meanings so it is important to distinguish between these terms.

A “job”is work for which you receive pay. It is therefore a means to live and may or may not be long-term or lead to anything else by way of work. For this reason a job can be seen as one large task or a series of tasks that is typically performed in return for money. Contract work and project work often contain “jobs” that have to be done, usually on a fixed-term basis (even if they are repeated over many months and even years). Individuals tend to talk about their work as “just a job” when it doesn’t give them much long-term career satisfaction.

An “occupation” is a wide category of jobs with similar characteristics. In other words, an occupation is a broad title for what someone does on a continual basis. This means that all of their work tends to fit into a professional category that most people recognize. There are many examples in this category but some might be an accountant, doctor, engineer, nurse, plumber, police officer, scientist or teacher. As you can see, most occupations are fairly well-understood in concept, if not specific terms, and there is therefore lots of good information to be gathered on them (online, for example) as a future career option. Job satisfaction is often greater in an occupational role, but in modern times, it is far less likely than it used to be that people stay in only one occupation. Today, many of us will change occupations several times in our lives.

Finally, a “career” is a lifetime journey of building and making good use of your skills, knowledge and experiences (wherever these are invested). Put another way, a career is a period of long-term employment usually in a given area or industry. An individual will therefore typically spend many years in an area or industry and perform what may be several different roles. A career is consequently similar to an occupation but is often much broader, as it may involve several linked occupational jobs in the same or similar fields. For example, a doctor might start as a resident at a hospital, become a surgeon, act as a specialist, become a medical director and finally become a hospital administrator. These are four very directly linked occupations but can be considered a career in the medical field.

Of course, in a more general sense, there is nothing stopping individuals from pursuing quite a varied career in which he or she starts as an accountant for instance, works his or her way up to a Chief Financial Officer, later becoming a Chief Executive. S/he may even end his or her career on the board of an entirely different company in an unfamiliar field — still very much a career!

So in summary, a job is work for which you receive pay, an occupation is a range of jobs with similar characteristics and finally a career is a lifetime of making good use of your skills, knowledge and experiences.

Why does it matter?

If you simply want a job, you may be happy to collect your money as a return for the hours you put in and not worry that much about where it may lead you in the future. Both younger and older employees often feel that this is entirely acceptable, as they either want to gain some experience for their résumé or have to earn money to fund their out-of-work activities or interests. However, as soon as you start to think about other issues such as greater job interest, growth, learning and development, and collaboration opportunities, you are starting to think in more occupational terms (a field of activity in which you might flourish) and career terms (where one job may well lead to another that you may enjoy even more). For this reason, we will be examining how to look at occupations and careers that provide the greatest potential for enjoyment for individuals. And in order to do this we first have to know quite a lot about ourselves.

Source by Jon Warner

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4 Reasons to Pay Attention to Work-Life Balance

Work-life balance is a topic that regularly comes up as important. Trouble is that, when it comes to work-life balance, people have difficulty in defining what it means to them, worry that even mentioning work-life balance will go against them or simply see it as unattainable.

So if you are a leader, why should you pay attention to work-life balance?

Reason 1: The stakes are high

According to research, someone who is suffering from high levels of stress is 9 times more likely to make a mistake. While we all make mistakes from time to time, having undue levels of stress or worry increases the likelihood of making a major mistake.

Reason 2: Decline in productivity

There are more and more demands on all of us to be more productive. We all hoped that gadgets would ultimately increase our productiveness. While this is true to some extent, they have in other ways added to our stress. If you don’t make a point of getting some rest and recovery from time to time, your productivity will without doubt decrease.

Reason 3: People are high cost items

In any major organisation, staff costs are a significant part of the overall operating cost. In some organisations, they can account for around 70% of the overall expenditure. If there was a piece of equipment that your business was 70% reliant on, you would be more than happy to invest in making sure that it functioned optimally. People, like equipment, are assets and you should aim to treat them as such if you want the best results.

Reason 4: You are no good to the organisation if you are not there

While it is great that you or someone on the team is highly committed, fact is that you cannot contribute if you are not there. We all have our thresholds in terms of pressure and demands. Learn to recognise your pressure points and take action to avoid it becoming an issue.

The Bottom Line

Achieving results personally and through others requires you to keep performance at an optimal level. So what do you need to start paying attention to in order to create and deliver more success?

Source by Duncan Brodie

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Guide to New Employment Laws for California in 2018

Ban the Box: No Criminal History Inquiries before Making a Conditional Offer (Govt. Code § 12952)

All employers with five (5) or more employees are prohibited from including on any employment application a question that seeks disclosure of the applicant’s criminal history. The employer can not “inquire” or “consider” an applicant’s conviction history until after a conditional offer of employment has been made.

This also means employers can not use background checks that reveal criminal conviction history until after an offer is made.

If an employee intends to deny employment to an application because of an applicant’s conviction history, whether in whole or in part, it must make an individualized assessment of whether the applicant’s conviction history has a direct and adverse relationship with the specific duties of the job that justify denying the applicant the position. The employer should consider: (1) the nature and gravity of the offense or conduct; (2) the time that has passed since the indemnity or conduct and completion of the sentence; and (3) the nature of the job held or thought. This assessment may or may not memorialized in writing.

If the employer makes a preliminary decision that the applicant’s conviction history disqualifies the applicant from employment, the employer shall notify the applicant of this preliminary decision in writing. The notification shall contain: (1) notice of the disqualifying conviction or convictions that are the basis for the preliminary decision to rescind the offer; (2) a copy of the conviction history report, if any; and (3) an explanation of the applicant’s right to respond to the notice of the employer’s preliminary decision before that decision becomes final and the deadline by which to respond. The explanation will inform the applicant that the response may include submission of evidence challenging the accuracy of the conviction history report that is the basis for rescinding the offer, evidence of rehabilitation or mitigating circumstances, or both.

The applicant has at least five (5) business days to respond to the notice provided to the applicant before the employer may make a final decision. The applicant’s response may dispute the accuracy of the conviction history report that was the basis for the preliminary decision to rescind the offer. If the applicant states he / she is taking specific steps to obtain evidence supporting his / her dispute, then the applicant has five (5) additional business days to respond with the evidence.

If an employer makes a final decision to deny an application solely or in part because of the applicant’s conviction history, the employee will notify the applicable in writing. The notice must include: (1) the final denial or disqualification; (2) any existing procedure the employer has for the applicant to challenge the decision or request reconsideration; and (3) the right to file a complaint with the Department of Fair Employment and Housing.

Do Not Ask about Salary History (Labor Code § 432.3)

An employee may not seek salary history information about an applicant for employment. “Salary history information” including compensation and benefits.

The new law does not prohibit an applicant from voluntarily and without prompting disclosing salary history information to a prospective employer. If an applicant voluntarily and without prompting discloses salary history information to a prospective employer, the employer may consider or rely on that information in determining the salary for that applicable.

If an applicant requests the pay scale for a position, the employer must provide it.

Job-Protected Parental Leave Law (Govt. Code § 12945.6)

Employers with 20 or more employees must provide eligible employees up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave for new parents to bond with a new child within one (1) year of the child’s birth, adoption, or foster care placement. Unlike the federal Family and Medical Leave Act and the California Family Rights Act, this new law is limited to parental leave; it does not allow for leave due to the employee’s or the employees’ family member’s “serious health condition.”

A covered employer has between 20 and 49 employees with 75 miles of each other.

A covered employee has more than 12 months of service with the employer, and at least 1,250 hours of service with the employer during the previous 12-month period.

While the leave is unpaid, the employee is entitled to use any accrued vacation pay, paid sick time, or other accrued paid time off. In addition, the employer must maintain group health coverage during the leave at the same level and under the same conditions that would have been provided had the employee continued to work.

Immigration: Cooperation with Federal Authorities (Govt. Code §§ 7285.1, 7285.2, 7285.3, and Labor Code § 90.2)

Under current federal immigration law, when federal immigration authorities visit a worksite to perform enforcement activity, the employer may allow authorities to access nonpublic portions of the worksite voluntarily or requiring a warrant. California’s new law removes the employer’s ability to voluntarily allow access to nonpublic portions of the worksite.

The Labor Commissioner or Attorney General has exclusive authority to enforce this new law. Thus, there is no private right of action under the California Labor Code’s Private Attorneys General Act. Civil penalties range from $ 2,000-5,000 for the first violation and $ 5,000-10,000 for each consequent violation.

The new law also prevails employers from voluntarily providing immigration enforcement agents to access employee records without a subpoena or judicial warrant. This section does not apply to I-9 forms for which a Notice of Inspection has been provided to the employer.

If an employer receives any notifications of inspections of I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification forms or other employment records from an immigration agency, it must provide employees notice of the inspection within 72 hours of receiving notice. The notice must be hand-delivered at the worksite if possible, or by mail or email if hand delivery is not possible.

Retaliation: Labor Commissioner Now Authorized to Obtain a Preliminary Injunction (Labor Code § 98.7)

An employee or the Labor Commissioner may obtain a preliminary injunction order compelling the employer to reinstate an employee pending the resolution of the employee’s retaliation lawsuit. Meaning, an employer may be required to re-hire an employee during the time it takes to litigate the employee’s claim that he / she was subject to unlawful retaliation, which usually takes no less a year or more.

Moreover, the new law drastically reduces the burden of proof for injunctive relief in retaliation cases. The general standard for a temporary restraining order or permanent injunction requires the party to prove (1) irreparable harm if the injunction is not granted, (2) likelihood of the success on the merits of the claim, and (3) these interests outweigh whatever harm the defensive will suffer if an injunction is granted. Now, injunctive relief will be granted if the individual makes a mere showing that “reasonable cause” exists to believe the employee was unlawfully terminated or subjected to an adverse action.

In addition to handing employees a much lower burden of proof than other forms of injunctive relief, the court must consider “the chilling effect on other employees asserting their rights under those laws in determining if temporary injunctive relief is just and proper.” Thus, the court must consider an entirely new factor that only favors the employees.

Postings and Notices

Benefits
The Employment Development Department made changes to DE 2320 For Your Benefit and the Paid Family Leave pamphlets. DE 2320 must be distributed to an employee upon termination or lay off, or on a leave of absence.

Paid Family Leave no longer has a seven-day waiting period.

Victim’s Rights Pamphlet
All employers must provide new employees with written notice about the rights of victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking to take protected time off for medical treatment or legal proceedings. The Victims of Domestic Abuse pamphlet can be found on the California Department of Industrial Relations Website

Transgender Rights Poster
The Department of Fair Employment and Housing developed a new transgender rights poster. All employers with five (5) or more employees must post this information. If you order the federal and state law employment poster updated annually and published by the California Chamber of Commerce, the information is contained therein. Otherwise, the poster can be found on the Department of Fair Employment and Housing website.

Also, employers should familiarize themselves with California’s new identification documentation. California identification cards, birth certificates and driver’s licenses can include one (1) of three (3) gender options: female, male or nonbinary. They will be phased in beginning September 1, 2018, for birth certificates, and January 1, 2019, for driver’s licenses.

Minimum Wage Increase

For employers with 26 or more employees, the state minimum wage increased to $ 11 / hour. For employers with 25 or fewer workers, the state minimum wage increased to $ 10.50 / hour.

The minimum salary threshold for executive, administrative and professional exemptions increased for 2018. The threshold is based on the state minimum wage, not any local minimum wage. The minimum monthly salary exemption for employers with 26 or more employees is $ 3,813.33 / month ($ 45,760 / year).

For employers with 25 or fewer workers, the minimum monthly salary exemption is $ 3,640 / month ($ 43,680 / year).

New I-9 Form (07/17/17 N)

The latest form can be found on the US Citizenship and Immigration Services Website.

IRS Standard Mileage Rate Increases

The 2018 IRS Mileage Rate increased to 54.5 cents / mile for business travel.

Reminders of Local Ordinances

Minimum Wage
The minimum wage for employees working in Los Angeles City increased on July 1, 2016, to $ 10.50 / hour for companies with 26 or more employees. For employers with 25 or fewer employees, minimum wage increased to $ 10.50 on July 1, 2017. The increases will continue as follows:

Employers with 26 or more employers
7/1/16 $ 10.50
7/1/17 $ 12.00
7/1/18 $ 13.25
7/1/19 $ 14.25
7/1/20 $ 15.00

Employers with 25 or fewer employees
7/1/17 $ 10.50
7/1/18 $ 12.00
7/1/19 $ 13.25
7/1/20 $ 14.25
7/1/21 $ 15.00

Paid Sick Leave
LA City enacted an ordinance requiring 48 hours of paid sick leave per year, doubling California’s sick pay law. Unlike the state law which contains exceptions for certain occupations such as construction workers, certain home health workers, flight crews and workers covered by union agreements, the LA ordinance contains no exceptions. Employers with 26 or more employees were required to comply by July 1, 2016. Employers with 25 or less employees were required to comply by July 1, 2017.

Paid sick leave accrues on the first day of employment and may be used beginning on the 90th day. Employers may either grant a lump sum (“front-load”) of paid sick leave or have it accrue at the rate of one (1) hour of sick leave for every 30 hours worked. However, the state law has additional accurual options not allowed by the LA ordinance. Further, under the front-load approach, state law provides that there is no carry over of unused sick time. The LA ordinates holds that up to 72 hours must carry over year to year but it does not state whether this carry over requirement applies to front-load plans.

Like state law, unused sick leave need not be paid out upon separation. If an employee separates and is rehireed within one (1) year, any unused sick time must be reinstated. Unlike, state law, the LA ordinance does not have an exception to reinstatement if paid sick leave was paid out upon separation, ie, under a PTO policy.

Source by Robyn McKibbin

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Job Search: 7 Tips for Successful Phone Interviews

The phone interview is such a crucial part of the hiring phase because if you can’t make a good first impression on the phone, your chances of being invited for an in-person interview are nil. Below are 7 tips to keep in mind for successful phone interviews.

1. Choose a quiet environment.

Be sure you’re taking the call in a place where you won’t be distracted and where you won’t have background noises such as the television, radio, dogs barking, kids crying, etc. For example, if you are surprised by a call on your cell phone while at the grocery store, ask the person if you can call them right back or put them on hold until you can find a quiet, secluded place to speak. Better yet, ask the caller if you can schedule the interview for a mutually convenient time, preferably for when you can be away from the commotion and can take notes.

2. Prepare as you would for an in-person interview.

You might be the type who can answer questions on the fly, and maybe you know the job description quite well by heart. Still, it’s best to prepare ahead of time and have your notes, the job description, your resume, and whatever other reference materials you need within reach. The majority of phone interviews are efficient screening calls made by recruiters. They want to know if you fit the criteria of the job description and if your salary is in the ballpark. Experienced recruiters can usually determine this pretty quickly. However, you might find that some recruiters prefer to have a more in-depth conversation with you, and sometimes it’s the hiring manager who conducts the phone interview. Just in case, you should prepare as you would for a full-fledged, in-person interview.

3. Be prepared to answer screening-out questions.

The typical purpose of the phone interview is to screen out candidates. The interviewer is looking for red flags. He or she is trying to narrow the field of candidates and select the best matches to invite in for a face-to-face interview. You’ll get questions like:

  • Why are you looking for a new position? (Answer in a positive way no matter how unhappy you are about your situation!)
  • Walk me through your background. Why did you leave here, why did you leave there… ? (Always give a positive spin to your reason for leaving. Talk about what you did in your previous experience as it relates back to the position at hand.)
  • What are your strengths/weaknesses?
  • What was your biggest accomplishment during your last position?
  • What specific projects have you worked on?
  • Why are you interested in our position/company?

4. Engage with good questions.

First of all, definitely ask questions. However, don’t ask what could appear to be “it’s all about me” questions. Also, at this stage, it’s better for the interviewer to be the one who mentions money or benefits. These are topics that you might have to address when asked about them during a phone interview, but they’re best left, if at all possible, until the later and/or final stages of the hiring process. Your only goal at this point should be to convince the interviewer that your skills and experience fit their needs. Ask the interviewer how success is defined for this position. Ask the interviewer what are the most important elements of the job description. Ask the interviewer why the position is open. Those are examples of good questions for a phone interview. And, of course, listen well to their responses, taking notes if you can.

5. Speak clearly.

This might be an obvious tip, but it’s such a vital thing to remember with phone interviews because it’s through your words and your tone of voice that you get the chance to make a great impression. Keep the mouthpiece near your mouth. Don’t chew gum, eat, drink, or smoke. Sounds are amplified over the phone – the sounds of smacking, chewing, swallowing, and inhaling/exhaling are certain to be picked up. Besides, if your mouth is busy with that other activity, you won’t be as coherent as you need to be when you need to speak.

6. Use the name of your interviewer.

Write down the name of the interviewer when you first hear it, and use it occasionally throughout the conversation. People like the sound of their own name, and this easy tip will go a long way in helping you to build rapport. Beware that you don’t overdo it though. The key word here is “occasionally.” Using a person’s name every time you respond could sound contrived and unnatural.

7. Smile.

Let the interviewer “hear the smile” in your voice. Some experts says that you should prop up a mirror where you are doing the interview so that you can observe yourself and, therefore, remind yourself to smile. If you prefer not to do that, at least have a post-it note with the word “smile” written on it, and put it where you’ll see it during the call. Phone interviewing deprives you of the chance to communicate your excitement and interest through your facial expressions and eye contact. Your voice is the only way you have to project positive energy and convey how you feel. You’ll naturally feel more enthusiastic when you smile, and your voice will definitely reflect your smile.

Source by Angela Loeb

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Job Search Techniques That Don’t Work

You frequently know when you’ve simply made an enormous error in your job application. You skip to attach your CV. You send the incorrect version. You address the resume cover letter to Mr. Chris Smith, then find out there’s a solid possibility Chris is a girl. But other times, you possess no notion you may actually think you’re doing all the things right. Actually, there are a few regular job search methods that applicants employ over and over since they believe they work perfectly. In fact, though, these very same approaches might be standing in the path of you and that great interview. To ensure you possess the very best probabilities of inching better to your desire job, here are four regular blunders and very much more successful methods to try preferably.

1. Applying to as many Jobs as possibly.

Persons frequently think that the job search is a quantities game. The extra resumes you send, the even more likely it’ll be that somebody will contact you back, right? Not actually. Since applying to hundreds of jobs involves you’re most likely not taking the time to really investigate the organization and position, customize each request appropriately, and touch base to recent employees who may have the ability to give you insider details.

Likewise, applicants sometimes consider that applying to innumerable positions at the exact organization ups their probabilities of getting called back for one of these people. In fact, although this sends one of 3 messages: That you’re not convinced what you want, that you’re needy and you’ll take whatever, or that you don’t possess a solid understanding on what every job requires. In any circumstance, not a good thing.

How to Fix this? Quality instead of quantity. Rather than applying to every single semi important job within a 70 mile radius, begin your search by putting together a concise list of ideal firms and learning anything you can regarding them. When they have opportunities that fit your skill set, consider the time to cautiously build your application modifying your CV bullets to display precisely how your knowledge aligns, composing a tailor made cover letter, and requesting your new connections if they possess guidance for standing out. Yes, this strategy takes even more time and strength than submitting your same CV at over and over, but your probabilities of scoring a job interview will be substantially, much bigger.

2. Applying ASAP.

OK, so you’ve simplified your list of corporations, and one of them just published a role that’s precisely according with your skill set. Amazing, so you crank out all the things as fast as feasible and hit send seeking to be the 1st request the employing manager views. Not only will you demonstrate just how thrilled you are regarding the job, yet probably the team will like your application so very much they won’t require to interview any individual else. News flash: This almost never does you any favors.

How to Fix this? Give it a Day or So.

9 times out of 10, managers have to throw out the applications they obtain within just the first hour of publishing a position since they’re unfinished. When you’re concentrated on velocity over anything else, it’s easy to lose the information getting names correct, counting additional components, and so on. It’s considerably better to provide your self a day or 2 to compose, edit, and change your elements, make sure you’ve covered everything required, and have somebody else look them over. And, once again, total reward if you get guidance from a recent employee. A outstanding application will be considerably better than a not truly there but prompt one, each time.

3. Emailing Your CV to People Unrequested.

Let’s return to all those persons who work at your dream corporations for an instant. Meeting them and making their radar: Very good. Requesting their advice on doing the job there: Also fantastic. Sending them your CV unrequested with a note that says, Here’s my CV allow me to know if you know of nearly anything I’d be a fit for! Very bad idea! Sure, in a few cases, you may get successful, but commonly only in the off chance that the organization is employing for a role that matches your precise skills. But this move can also be interpreted as you requesting your good new contact, who’s previously been useful in talking to you regarding the organization, to do the effort for you critiquing your CV, looking at to see if any available positions are a match, and forwarding along your data.

How to Fix this?: Apply Normally, Then Allow Your Contact Be aware of.

Yes, you may and ought to ask your contact for guidance before you apply. And then if, in the course of action, he or she provides to pass your cv or a suggestion along, that’s great. But by no means make this presumption. Consider those suggestions you’ve discovered and then do the very difficult work, just like any other applicant would do. Take a look at a company’s jobs page, discover your dream position, then send an application by way of all the needed parts.

Source by Ramon Tarruella